PPG Survey

Please let the surgery know if you would like to be part of the group of patients that informs our decision making. Emails can be sent to broccg.WPKSsupportgroup@nhs.net  or write to Lindsey Young, Practice Manager.

PPG report 2014-15

The Wickham Park Surgery Patient Participation Group was started as a virtual group in 2012. The group comprises 295 members, both male and female, who range widely in age and ethnicity. We are currently addressing ways in which we can attract a wider range of ages and ethnicities into the group. Currently posters in the waiting room, the patient display board and the website invite all age groups and ethnicities to join the PPG. Patients registering for the first time with the practice are all invited to join. Information is also available in the practice leaflet and online.

 PPG Ethnicity and Age

As in previous years the surgery and PPG have carried out virtual meetings via email.  The practice’s demographics remain the same and the PPG is still representative of the practice population in terms of ethnicity, gender age and inclusion of particular groups. We are working to try to increase representation of some ethnicities to more.

The PPG virtual group was consulted four times. Initially consultation was using a bespoke survey run through survey monkey to determine the group’s priority areas for action.

A full report of the survey analysis was then circulated to PPG members for further comment and email feedback.

A meeting was held between partners, the practice manager and some practice staff to discuss areas to address prioritised by this year’s patient survey.

The conclusions were shared by email with the PPG with request for comment and feedback.

The three priority area determined by the PPG were:

  • Getting an appointment 89.6% rated it most important
  • Clinical Care 65.5% rated it most important
  • Waiting room 60.3% rated it most important

PPG said: Main priority is “getting an appointment” with “clinical care” second on the priority list.

PPG said: Waits to get an appointment were “too long” that you “need to be seen as soon as possible when you are unwell” that “you don’t want to wait” and that “where possible you want to see the doctor of your choice”

PPG said: Appointments were mainly made by telephone (57%) and were easy to make (58%). Opening times were convenient (80%) but that there were “not enough appointments” (60%).

PPG said: The waiting room is not satisfactory “cramped waiting area”; “overcrowded waiting area”; “waiting area too small” along with “waiting room wholly unsatisfactory” “no privacy” and “needs to be accessible and fit for purpose”

Action taken on appointments:

  • Increased the number of salaried doctors working at the practice (in particular, extra sessions on a Monday and a Friday).
  • Increased the number of appointments overall to help reduce the need for people to attend A&E and urgent care services in winter.
  • Increased the number of Health Care assistants to help with disease monitoring and call and recall systems.
  • Started a telephone call back service to save having to make an appointment for results.

 Action taken on clinical care:

  • The practice has expanded the in-house education sessions for all clinicians from bi-monthly to monthly to allow greater opportunity to focus clinical learning and share knowledge.
  • The practice has engaged with a CCG programme to enhance uptake of electronic referral for patients. To improve patient choice and clinical care. The practice has achieved 100% referrals through CAB in Dec 2014 & Jan 2015, the first two months of the scheme.

 Action taken on waiting room:

  • An “automated check in” has been installed reducing the number of patients queuing at the reception desk.
  • A prescription letter box has been installed on the outside wall of the surgery allowing requests to be posted without having to enter the waiting room.
  • Electronic prescriptions (EPS2) have been championed by the practice again to reduce the number footfalls in the waiting room.
  • Online appointment booking has been encouraged to reduce the number of callers at the reception desk.
  • A bid to move premises has been revised & resubmitted to NHS England

Actions proposed:

  • Look at the highest demand times and the least well-staffed times and try to improve access at these times.
  • Attend a medico-legal training course to look at the confidentiality and safety issues with email and telephone consultations before starting to offer this service.
  • Look at whether there are additional in-house services we can provide (space is our limiting factor here – we need rooms to be free to offer the services in)
  • Consider restarting a Saturday morning service (it was moved to early Fri am after consultation as it was underused and had a high failure to attend rate)
  • We will continue to share ideas with PPG for improving access and welcome your opinions and feedback.
  • Look at an automated telephone booking system
  • Raise awareness of online booking facilities and telephone callback.

Review of previous areas of focus:

In 2012-13 the PPG decided to focus on premises development as the priority area. This decision culminated in the PPG supporting a business case submitted to the team at NHS England for a move to purpose built premises at a local development site. This proposal was also supported by the CCG.

Unfortunately the NHS reorganisation meant that throughout 2013 and much of 2014 there was no identifiable route with which to advance this proposal and the process stalled. The PPG continue to support the proposed move and the unsuitability of the premises for a growing practice is an ever present theme in discussions.

Towards the end of the financial year 2014/15 with the advent of the Primary Care Infrastructure Fund for GP Premises the process started to move again and a revised business case and outline project initiation document (PID) were submitted to NHS England again with the support of the PPG.

Access to discussions and reports:

Complete copies of the survey results are available on request at reception (on paper) or electronically on request by email.

The report has been posted on the website. (Annex D below)

A poster is displayed in the waiting room informing patients of this report and its availability on the practice website.  Copies are available at the reception desk for patients who do not have access to a computer.

London Region South London Area Team

Practice Name: Wickham Park Surgery

Practice Code: G84607
Prerequisite of Enhanced Service – Develop/Maintain a Patient Participation Group (PPG)

Does the Practice have a PPG? YES

Method(s) of engagement with PPG: Face to face, Email, Other (please specify)

The primary means of engagement with the PPG is by email. Participation is also encouraged through advertising in the waiting room; on the practice website and through the practice blog.

Suggestions and topics are also developed from comments made via the friends and family test; through the patient suggestion letterbox and following a visit to the practice by Healthwatch.

Number of members of PPG: 295

Detail the gender mix of practice population and PPG:

%

Male

Female

Practice

 47%

53%

PRG

 33.8%

 66%

Detail of age mix of practice population and PPG:

%

<16

17-24

25-34

35-44

45-54

55-64

65-74

> 75

Practice

 19%

 9.7%

 12%

12%

15.5%

13.3%

9.3%

9.3%

PRG

0.3%

8.5%

9.5%

16.3%

17%

17.3%

18.6%

12.5%

Detail the ethnic background of your practice population and PRG:

  White Mixed/ multiple ethnic groups
  British Irish Gypsy or Irish traveller Other white White & black Caribbean White & black African White & Asian Other mixed
Practice  2904  106  0  228  81  57  37  26
PRG  224  2  0  2  0  0  0  0
  Asian/Asian British Black/African/Caribbean/Black British Other
  Indian Pakistani Bangladeshi Chinese OtherAsian African Caribbean Other Black Arab Any other
Practice  1020  14  26  32  3  155  72  14  2  28
PRG  6  0  0  1  3  7  6  0  0  0

Describe steps taken to ensure that the PPG is representative of the practice population in terms of gender, age and ethnic background and other members of the practice population:

All patients registering at the practice are made aware of the PPG. For existing patients the PPG is advertised in the waiting room, on the practice website and through the practice blog.

  

Are there any specific characteristics of your practice population which means that other groups should be included in the PPG? e.g. a large student population, significant number of jobseekers, large numbers of nursing homes, or a LGBT community?

NO

If you have answered yes, please outline measures taken to include those specific groups and whether those measures were successful:

1. Review of patient feedback

Outline the sources of feedback that were reviewed during the year:

Members of the PPG were surveyed directly using an emailed link to a “survey monkey” survey. The link was also advertised on the practice website and blog and paper copies of the survey were available at reception.

Information was also gathered from paper FFT returns where comments had been made. The patient suggestion box was also a limited source of feedback.

Comments shared by Healthwatch after they visited and assessed the practice were also taken into account.

Information was collated and fed back in its entirety to all members of the PPG by email.

The survey monkey responses were shared in anonymised format with all of the group.

Proposals and actions were drafted and circulated for comment by email.

How frequently were these reviewed with the PRG?

The PPG email inbox is open for comments 365 days of the year.

Where specific information is shared reminders seeking feedback are usually sent twice.

1. Action plan priority areas and implementation

Priority area 1

Description of priority area: The main priority was “getting an appointment” (89.6% rated it most important)

What actions were taken to address the priority?

As a result of this priority area, the practice:

Increased the number of salaried doctors working at the practice (in particular extra sessions on a Monday and a Friday).

Increased the number of appointments overall to help reduce the need for people to attend A&E and urgent care services in winter.

Signed up to participate in the CCG Winter pressures scheme

Increased the number of Health Care assistants to help with disease monitoring and call and recall systems.

Started a telephone call back service to reduce the number of appointments used to follow up results.

Result of actions and impact on patients and carers (including how publicised):

Despite the actions above, concerns about access remain a priority for the CCG. A number of other actions are planned to further ease the situation:

Look at the highest demand times and the least well-staffed times and try to improve access at these times.

Investigate confidentiality and safety issues with email and telephone consultations preparatory to developing this service.

Look into an automated telephone booking system to improve access

Raise awareness of online booking facilities and telephone appointments.

Consider restarting a Saturday morning surgery (it was moved to early Fri am after consultation as it was underused and had a high failure to attend rate)

We will continue to share ideas with the PPG for improving access and welcome their opinions and feedback.

Priority area 2

Description of priority area:

The second highest priority was given to clinical care. (65.5% rated it most important)

What actions were taken to address the priority?

A survey of the PPG was undertaken to determine how the patient’s rated clinical care.

Although it was given as a priority area patients were generally pleased with the quality of clinical care they received but expressed difficulties being able to access the Clinician of their choice.

“we feel the practice is sympathetic to patient’s needs and well managed”;

“most times the practice serves me well in these matters”

“we need good doctors able to advise, treat and refer. I’ve found this is the case with your surgery”

“the quality of care from doctors and nurses is always good”

“care and treatment is superb”

“generally the doctors and nurses are efficient, professional and dedicated”

“I like the feeling I am being dealt with by “friends” who care. I don’t feel I am just a number”

Result of actions and impact on patients and carers (including how publicised):

The practice has expanded the in-house education sessions for all clinicians from bi-monthly to monthly to allow greater opportunity to enhance and share clinical learning.

The practice has engaged with a CCG programme to enhance uptake of electronic referral for patients. To improve patient choice and clinical care. The practice has achieved 100% referrals through CAB in Dec 2014 & Jan 2015, the first two months of the scheme.

This achievement has been publicised in the surgery.

Priority area 3

Description of priority area:

The third highest priority was given to reception issues by the PPG (60.3% rated it most important)

What actions were taken to address the priority?

The PPG participation group highlighted that the receptionist were very helpful (63%) or fairly helpful (34%). The main area of concern was with the suitability for the waiting room to meet its purpose.

Comments such as “cramped waiting area”; “overcrowded waiting area”; “waiting area too small” along with “waiting room wholly unsatisfactory” “no privacy” and “needs to be accessible and fit for purpose” led us to look as possible strategies to improve the waiting room.

After discussion and an informal consultation with an architect we have agreed that it is not possible to alter the waiting room itself without substantial works to the premises. Steps have instead been taken to try to reduce the footfall through the waiting room.

An “automated check in” has been installed reducing the number of patients queuing at the reception desk.

A prescription letter box has been installed on the outside wall of the surgery allowing requests to be posted without having to enter the waiting room.

Electronic prescriptions (EPS2) have been championed by the practice again to reduce the number footfalls in the waiting room.

Online appointment booking has been encouraged again to reduce the number of callers at the reception desk.

An automated telephone appointment booking system is being investigated.

A bid to move premises has been revised & resubmitted to NHS England

Result of actions and impact on patients and carers (including how publicised):

The changes have been advertised by posters and flyers, on the website and blog and by word of mouth.

The PPG recognises the limitations of the premises themselves and is aware of shared history of past plans and projects that have been explored to address this issue.

Progress on Previous Years

PPG Sign Off

PPG Sign Off

Report signed off by PPG: YES

 

Date of sign off: 30.03.15

 

 

Report Sign off by PPG: YES

Date of sign off: 30.03.15

How has the practice engaged with the PPG:

How has the practice made efforts to engage with seldom heard groups in the practice population?

Has the practice received patient and Carer feedback from a variety of sources?

Was the PPG involved in the agreement of priority areas and the resulting action plan?

How has the service offered to patients and carers improved as a result of the implementation of the action plan?

Do you have any other comments about the PPG or practice in relation to this area of work?

 

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